5 top notions stitch up a crumb quilted needle case

Yesterday I showed you how to make needle case using scraps or ‘crumbs’ of fabric backed with Heatnbond featherlite fusible web.

Finished needle case

Today, I’ll show you how to make another sewing/needle case using more fusible scraps. This time, I’ll be adding some storage pockets for scissors, thimbles and other sewing tools.

Here’s what you’ll need:

HeatnBond fusible interfacing

  • (1) 12½” x 8½” piece of fabric for inside of needle case
  • (1) 4″ x 11″ piece of fabric for pocket
  • (1) 8″ x 5″ piece of wool or felt. I cut this using the Olfa wave blade on my Komfort Kut rotary cutter for a decorative edge.

Rotary cutter with Olfa wave blade

Fabric scraps backed with HeatnBond Featherlite fusible web

I had one piece of fabric without fusible web, so I used some Mary Ellen’s Best Press to add body to the fabric. The new Best Press spray and misting bottle is easy to fill and gives a consistent, non-drip spray of extra fine mist.

Mary Ellen’s Best Press with spray and misting bottle

I wanted to use my fusible shapes just as they were, as much as possible. Your arrangement of fabric crumbs will be different of course, but just use what you have.

  • Press the shapes onto the fusible interfacing and stitch around the raw edges. I used two different colors of Sulky variegated thread.

Front of needle case stitched with Sulky variegated threads

  • Trim so the front of your needle case is 7″ x 11″. I used my Olfa frosted 12½” square ruler for this step. I can cut any size square up to 12½” with it, and I love the non-slip finish on this ruler!

Trim edges with Olfa frosted ruler for non-slip cutting

Inside Pocket

  • Fold the 4″ x 11″ pocket piece in half, right sides together, to make a 4″ x 5½” rectangle.
  • Stitch down the long sides.
  • Turn right side out and press. I stitched 1½” from one folded edge to divide the pocket into 2 sections, but this is optional.

Be sure to come back tomorrow and I’ll show you how to finish up this little sewing/needle case!

This is part 4 of 5 in this series

Go back to part 3: Crumb quilting makes a spectacular needle case!

Go to part 5: Making the most of your fabric scraps for cool quilted projects!

Related posts

Why and how Odif 505 basting spray makes quilting easy!

1 pressing technique for flat seams every time!

THE easy way to trim Half Rectangle Triangles perfectly every time