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10 steps to face binding a holiday table runner using PFAFF creative icon

by Claire Haillot

 

If you’ve finished the holiday table runner that I presented in my last two posts, I have a great tutorial for you today. I’m happy to share my 10 steps to a perfect finish. You’ll see how easy it is to make a face binding using the PFAFF creative icon.

 

A face binding is my favorite "perfect" finish to any art quilt or table runner

A face binding is my favorite “perfect” finish to any art quilt or table runner

 

I just love making face binding on the creative icon as it has the power, stability and precision required to have a superb finish. When designing the creative icon, PFAFF revamped the base design to reduce the vibrations, giving us the power and stability needed for precision even in small detailed areas. They’ve also increased the needle piercing force by more than 90% to 150 NWT for more strength, and I saw the difference when making my mitered corners.

Now to make the face binding, you still need to make your 2¼” strips and fold in half. You need to create the strips to fit on all 4 sides of the quilt. My holiday table runner size is 17” x 25½”, so I made two 17” strips and two 25½” strips to finish my project.

 

To make a face binding, you still need to make your 2¼” strips and fold in half.

To make a face binding, you still need to make your 2¼” strips and fold in half.

 

Once again, it will be important to use the red lines on the ¼” foot just like in my blog post explaining how to make mitered corner borders. The reason is simple: we will be making mitered corners for a nice finish, and the creative icon will make it really easy. Here are the steps:

 

Position your foot ¼” from the edge of the quilt.

Position your foot ¼” from the edge of the quilt.

 

  1. Place a strip on the quilt top side, aligning the raw edges. Note: For photo purposes, I used a light thread so that you could see my stitches. However, if I would have made the project without having to photograph for my blog, I would have used a red thread so that it would be invisible. Using the ¼” foot with the integrated dual feed system and single hole plate, position your foot ¼” from the edge of the quilt. It’s simple to position your foot by placing the edge of the quilt on the red line just behind the foot. I like to start with one stitch forward then I press on the “immediate tie off” to secure my stitch before continuing. This step ensures that the strip will not become loose and I will have a nice mitered corner. Stitch along the edge, at ¼” seam allowance and stop at ¼” from the edge. Once again, I used the immediate tie off to finish then I cut the thread.

 

Stop stitching your binding at ¼” from the edge.

Stop stitching your binding at ¼” from the edge.

 

2. Finger press the edges of the strips to make a mitered corner.

 

Step 2 and 3

Step 2 and 3

 

3. Position the next strip on the edge of the quilt and repeat step 2 – 4.

Once all the strips are sewn to the quilt top, the next step is to make the mitered corners:

4. Fold the quilt, right side together, so that the two strips align perfectly face to face and place needle exactly at the junction of the ¼” seam allowance.

 

Once the bindings are stitched in place, we need to prepare the mitered corners.

Once the bindings are stitched in place, we need to prepare the mitered corners.

 

5. Fold the quilt, right sides together, so the two strips align perfectly face to face and place needle exactly at the junction of the ¼” seam allowance. Then stitch along the fold outward. I also press on the “immediate tie off” once I reach the edge of the binding strip.

 

Fold the quilt, right sides together, so that the two strips align perfectly face to face and place needle exactly at the junction of the ¼” seam allowance.

Fold the quilt, right sides together, so that the two strips align perfectly face to face and place needle exactly at the junction of the ¼” seam allowance.

 

6. Cut all excess fabric at ¼”. Press the seam allowances open.
7. I like to snip off the corner of the quilt to reduce bulk.
8. Repeat for all four corners.

 

For a perfect corner, trim excess fabric and snip corner.

For a perfect corner, trim excess fabric and snip corner.

 

Congratulations! You’ve made the most difficult part. Now for the final touch:

9. Turn the binding to the back side of the quilt, and press it so that the facing does not show on the front. Use a blunt tip tool to help you make perfect corners.

 

Turn the binding to the back side of the quilt, and press it so that the facing does not show on the front

Turn the binding to the back side of the quilt, and press it so that the facing does not show on the front

 

10. Hand stitch the folded edge of the binding to the back of the quilt.

 

Hand stitch the folded edge of the binding to the back of the quilt.

Hand stitch the folded edge of the binding to the back of the quilt.

 

You’ll be amazed at how simple it is to make a face binding using the PFAFF creative icon. I just love how this finish helps keep the focus on the project rather than on the binding. I use this quilt binding method on all my art quilts now. Come back tomorrow, I’ll show you another great project you can do using the curved piecing.

 

Perfect binding for your Christmas table runner.

Perfect binding for your Christmas table runner.

 

 

This is part 3 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 2: How to center a quilt section in a PFAFF creative icon hoop

Go to part 4: Curved piecing makes the best heart quilt block for Valentine’s Day

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4 comments

Susan Spiers January 4, 2019 - 4:28 pm

A very imformative tutorial! I love the look of this binding!

Reply
Claire Haillot January 4, 2019 - 4:50 pm

Thanks Susan!
Don’t be afraid to try it out 🙂
It does give a great look to wall hangings and table runners.

Reply
Paul Leger December 26, 2018 - 4:51 pm

How do I get that plate of cookies? 🙂

Reply
Claire Haillot December 28, 2018 - 7:20 pm

Santa ate them! 🙂

Reply

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