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Adding dimension to applique pieces using fabric markers

 

Yesterday we colored some free motion quilting designs to instantly give the appearance of applique.

For the final post this week I’ll use the FABRIC FUN Fabric Markers to accent and add extra dimension to hand or machine applique.
Here we go.

 

Accent an applique with color
Accent an applique with color

 

I’m working on fabric from NORTHCOTT, the Black and White with a Dash of Color collection.

Our FABRIC FUN Fabric Markers will color just as beautifully on dyed or printed cotton fabric as they will on plain white.

 

Black and White with a Dash of Color from NORTHCOTT
Black and White with a Dash of Color from NORTHCOTT

 

FABRIC FUN Fabric Markers work wonders for hand or machine applique!

One of the most traditional and effective ways to use color with applique is to draw your applique shapes directly onto the right side of the fabric with black ink.

 

Draw the applique pieces with the thin or thick tip
Draw the applique pieces with the thin or thick tip

 

The line doesn’t need to be too neat as only a little will show.

The edge is turned under for this technique so be sure to cut out the applique pieces far enough outside the drawn line.

Turn the edge under using your favorite method.

Do not turn the drawn line all the way to the back. You’ll want it to show just above the edge where your fabric turns under. The dark line looks like a shadow and gives the applique the appearance that it’s three dimensional.

This method is usually reserved for hand applique as machine stitching would hide the edge.

Though black is traditionally used other colors can be used for a more modern look.

 

Turn the edge part way so that the black line shows on the edge.
Turn the edge part way so that the black line shows on the edge.

 

Color will instantly add dimension to our hand or machine applique pieces.

Remember that dark colors visually recede while light ones come forward.

A simple circle is the perfect shape for a flower center. When we add a dark edge to the circle it makes it look as though the center is dome shaped.

 

Dark color on the edge makes the center come forward
Dark color on the edge makes the center come forward

 

Placing the dark color in the center of the circle makes it appear to be shaped like a cone as the center recedes and the edges appear to come forward.

 

A dark color in the center visually recedes.
A dark color in the center visually recedes.

 

We have so many colors of FABRIC FUN Fabric Markers that sometimes I just want to use them all.

For this flower center I colored the dots on the yellow fabric with a variety of colors for a fun, playful appearance.

 

Create a fun playful look by adding multicolored dots.
Create a fun playful look by adding multicolored dots.

 

A more traditional flower center can be achieved by using a realistic color palette.

 

A more traditional flower center
A more traditional flower center

 

Amplify the three dimensional effect

Looking at the photo of freshly bloomed crocuses several things happening to make it look  three dimensional.

  1. The center of the flowers is a different color than the flower petals.
  2. The leaves in the background are crossing over and under one another.
  3. The petals roll inward on the top and or sides.
  4. The roll of the petals is a slightly different color than the rest of the petals and the veins on the petals accentuate the depth and direction of the petals.

We can use the techniques that I went over this week to mimic the way nature uses color.

 

Newly bloomed crocuses
Newly bloomed crocuses

 

This oval shaped flower petal is very pretty but we can make it even better.

 

This flower petal is pretty but we can make it even better
This flower petal is pretty but we can make it even better

 

I drew a rolled edge on the petal using my UNIQUE air erase marker.

Drawing the first step allows me to make changes if I’m not satisfied with the look of my petal.

 

A rolled over edge drawn on a petal
A rolled over edge drawn on a petal

 

A pen that’s a brighter color than the fabric was used to color the sections that I want to look as if they’re rolling to the front.

 

Rolled over edges colored with bright colors to add light
Rolled over edges colored with bright colors to add light

 

For the next step a darker pen was used to add a shadow to the underside of the visual rolled edge.

This shadow will give the impression of depth.

 

Darker shadow added for more dimension
Darker shadow added for more dimension

 

Texture lines were added to the center portion of the petal adding even more visual depth.

 

Texture lines added to petal center
Texture lines added to petal center

 

Look at how wonderfully three dimensional our colored petal appears when laid out with the other uncolored petals.

Just for fun I will make each petal a little different.

 

The flower will look three dimensional with the accents to the petals and center.
The flower will look three dimensional with the accents to the petals and center.

 

I have had a wonderful time this week exploring the many uses of FABRIC FUN Fabric Markers for coloring on cotton fabric.

Though I have used a flower theme to celebrate spring do remember that these techniques can be used anywhere your imagination takes you!

Please join me next month as I show you how to use fusible web applique, machine stitching and our colored applique pieces to create a cheerful welcome banner for your home.

 

This is part 5 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 4: Color your free motion quilting for the instant look of applique

Julie Plotniko is a quilting teacher, blogger and designer from Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. Teaching for almost 40 years, recent credits include Quilt Canada 2016 and 2017, many quilt guilds and groups throughout Canada and CreativFestival Sewing and Craft Shows in Victoria, Abbotsford and Toronto. When not on the road Julie works and teaches at Snip & Stitch Sewing Center in Nanaimo, BC. Her favorite things include free motion quilting (standard bed and mid-arm machines), precision piecing, scrap quilting, machine embroidery, blogging, designing and of course teaching. Julie believes that to see a student go from tentative beginnings to having confidence in themselves and their abilities is one of the greatest rewards that life has to offer.

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