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Halloween Loot Bag Ideas Using Scraps

Trick or treat is in the bag! Of all the loot bag ideas, our Halloween loot bag is the most important fashion accessory for October 31st. It uses up many scraps created from making this week’s Halloween door quilt.

Generally trick or treat loot bags are often quite informal things. They can range from cute little pumpkins to your very best pillow cases. The little pumpkin doesn’t hold much, and those pillow cases aren’t easy to replace, this is a good plan. Trust me.

This is a sturdy bag that also features grosgrain ribbon with reflective properties, which is great because Halloween activities are fun, but they need to be safe too.

You will need:

how-to

  • Cut out the bag main pieces and the lining pieces.
  • Trace all the owl pieces onto the paper side of the HeatnBond Feather Lite iron on adhesive. Protect your ironing board with an applique mat.
  • Fuse the HeatnBond to the fabric scraps. Cut out the parts and remove the backing paper, and iron them onto an 8 x 11 piece of night sky fabric. Use a zigzag stitch to attach the appliqued night sky fabric panel to one of the bag’s main pieces. Cut out triangles from the reflective tape.
  • Fuse a reflect tape triangle beak under the eyes.
  • Zigzag triangles onto the owl’s eyes.
  • Outline the owl’s eyes in decorative threads.

Outline the owl's reflective eyes in decorative threads.
Outline the owl’s reflective eyes in decorative threads.

 

 

Outline the owl’s wings in decorative threads.

Use a simple zigzag stitch and decorative threads to help the owl's wings pop on the the trick or treat bag.

Use a simple zigzag stitch and decorative threads to help the owl’s wings pop on the the trick or treat bag.

 

 

Match the bag side and bottom seams and pin together. Measure 1 1/2 inches from the corners of the bag lining, and draw a line straight across. Sew along the line and then cut 1/4 away from the sewn line. Repeat with the main bag. That's a boxed corner, y'all.
Match the bag side and bottom seams and pin together. Measure 1 1/2 inches from the corners of the bag lining, and draw a line straight across. Sew along the line and then cut 1/4 away from the sewn line. Repeat with the main bag. That’s a boxed corner, y’all.

 

 

  • Sew reflective ribbon to the top of the bag front and back. I used a strip of ribbon near the top of the front of the bag, and three strips of the same ribbon on the back of the bag.
  • Sew the bag front to the back.
  • Cut handles that are 4 inches x 8 inches. With right sides together, sew two tubes and turn them right side out. Press the tube so that the sewn seam is the center. Stitch the tube ends closed.
  • On the right side of the bag, measure 3 inches from the edge on both sides of the bag. Mark this and pin the handles so that the center seam matches the mark.

Attach the handles at the marks so that the center seam of the handle aligns with the placement mark.
Attach the handles at the marks so that the center seam of the handle aligns with the placement mark.

 

 

  • Sew the lining pieces together, leaving a 5 inch gap at the bottom for turning.
  • With right sides together, sew the lining to the bag top, taking care ensure the bag handles are hanging straight down inside the bag.
  • Turn the bag through the lining opening and slip stitch the opening closed. Press the top of the bag, and top stitch two lines of stitching  along the top to ensure the handles are very secure.

Two lines of top stitching will ensure the handles are secure enough to cart around a successful Halloween haul.
Two lines of top stitching will ensure the handles are secure enough to cart around a successful Halloween haul.

 

 

Give the whole loot bag a good press. Now, you’ve got Halloween in the bag.

My time on QUILTsocial is over for now. I hope everyone has a safe, happy, and candy filled Halloween.

Make sure you stop by to visit again for more quilty fun and lots of great giveaways!

Nancy Devine is a self-confessed craft-crazed blogger. She is a regular contributor to A Needle Pulling Thread Magazine, one of the administrators for The Craft Café, a Facebook page devoted to the international sharing of the creative life, and a curator of an impressive collection of fabrics, notions and seam rippers. In her spare time, she wrangles dust bunnies and writes a blog called Nancy Dee Needleworks. Understandably, her house is a mess.

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