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The Quilted Bucket Bag

Yesterday on QUILTsocial, we got our own colorway by using Dylon fabric dye to create the perfect canvas color for our bright and easy-breezy bucket bag. The quilted bucket bag is the perfect companion for all your summer adventures.

Let’s get started on putting it all together.

You will need

1/2 yd quilting cotton, top-weight denim, or chambray (main body)
1/2 yd muslin
1/2 yd quilt batting
1/2 yd quilting cotton (for lining)
1/2 canvas (natural color or one dyed to match the main fabric)
heavy weight or flexible firm interfacing
chalk marking pen air erasable marking pen
medium weight fusible adhesive
505 Reposition Adhesive
2 D-rings
72″ cord
cord stoppers
Polylite quilting thread
2.5″ circular template
Large Clever Clips
white glue
fabric scraps

 

Mark the mid point of the bag bottom on both sides of the fabric when you trace the template provided on the canvas bag bottom.
Mark the mid point of the bag bottom on both sides of the fabric when you trace the template provided on the canvas bag bottom.

 


 

  • Download and print the bag bottom pattern.
  • Trace the pattern onto canvas, transferring the center mark on each side of the fabric.
  • Spray baste the canvas to the heavyweight interfacing.
  • Cut out the bag bottom. Set aside.
  • Cut two pieces of fabric for the main body of the bag, 15″ x 9″.
  • Cut two strips of canvas 3 1/2″ x 15″.

 

Spray baste the heavy weight interfacing and the canvas bag bottom together.
Spray baste the heavy weight interfacing and the canvas bag bottom together.

 

 

  • Sew the canvas to the main bag fabric, using a 1/2″ seam. Press the seam open, then top stitch each side of the seam.
  • For the cord channel, which will be installed at the top of the bag, cut two pieces of canvas, 4″ x 15″. Fuse medium weight interfacing to both pieces of canvas.
  • Make a scant hem on the short ends of the cord channel: fold one end, sew, press, fold again, sew and press.
  • Do the same on one long end on both canvas strip (see photo). Set aside.

 

The canvas cord channel pieces are hemmed on three sides, using a scant 1/8" hem.
The canvas cord channel pieces are hemmed on three sides, using a scant 1/8″ hem.

 

 

  • Cut muslin and batting to measure 15″ x 14″ (there’s extra wiggle room for trimming after the quilting).
  • Spray baste the quilt sandwich together.
  • Set up your sewing machine to do FMQ — in whatever manner you desire.

TIP Try using Sulky’s Polylite thread for this. It’s very smooth and has a lovely subtle shimmer and ensures the quilting lines are a lovely element of the overall design.

 

Try this thread for free motion quilting. It has a lovely shimmer that enhances, not overwhelms, the meandering nature of FMQ.
Try this thread for free motion quilting. It has a lovely shimmer that enhances, not overwhelms, the meandering nature of FMQ.

 

 

 

Free motion quilting is an excellent summer adventure!
Free motion quilting is an excellent summer adventure!

 

 

Free Motion Quilting, like all great adventures, takes some twisting, turning paths! It’s so much fun to do, and a perfect choice for our easy-breezy bucket bag.

 

After the FMQ is finished, you'll need to trim the quilted fabric.
After the FMQ is finished, you’ll need to trim the quilted fabric.

 

 

Now that the main body of the easy-breezy bucket bag is quilted, and just shimmery with excitement, we’re ready to start assembling the pieces.

Come back to QUILTsocial tomorrow. We’re going to be getting our bag together so that we can take it on the road. Oh yes, the quilted bucket bag is going to be your perfect summer companion!

 

Nancy Devine is a self-confessed craft-crazed blogger. She is a regular contributor to A Needle Pulling Thread Magazine, one of the administrators for The Craft Café, a Facebook page devoted to the international sharing of the creative life, and a curator of an impressive collection of fabrics, notions and seam rippers. In her spare time, she wrangles dust bunnies and writes a blog called Nancy Dee Needleworks. Understandably, her house is a mess.

3 Comments

  1. Dawn Mason

    I love your patterns. I have problems trimming the quilted fabric without cutting the backing fabric. Do you have any tips on how to stop this happening. I am fairly new to quilting. Thank you.

    • Thanks for stopping by Dawn!
      I am not sure what you mean. Generally, the backing fabric (the back part of the quilt sandwich) is meant to be trimmed right along with the quilted fabric.
      If you are doing a lining, this is sewn as a separate piece (or pieces) and then added to the completed main bag. I hope that helps.
      Good luck with all your quilting endeavours!

  2. Sunny

    Good descriptions and clear photos to use to put the bag together!

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