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A tisket a tasket, this sewing table needs some baskets

Fabric baskets fit the Studio Collection Sewing and Design Table's shelves perfectly.
Fabric baskets fit the Studio Collection Sewing and Design Table’s shelves perfectly.

 

A tisket a tasket, this sewing table needs some baskets indeed! Making these quilted baskets is even more catchy than the rhyme.

The Studio Collection Sewing and Design table from HA Kidd is big on space for cutting, sewing, serging and pressing. It needs a little help when it comes to storage. The shelves in the unit are not that deep, but they are wide enough to accommodate these fabric baskets. In them, you can store 12 fat quarters, a couple of packages of Clever Clips, four charm packs…well, you get the picture.

The nice thing about the baskets is that they can be removed from the shelves while you’re working. Then, when you hang up your scissors at the end of the day, everything can be packed away in the baskets, and put back on the shelves.

What’s not to love about a quilted basket? They use up scraps of batting, fusible interfacing and fabric, and help get your sewing space organized.

Let’s get started!

Here’s how to make one: (warning: once you complete one, you’ll be making more)

Cut 2 pieces of each of the following 8 x 15 inches:

Use Clever Clips to keep all the parts of the baskets together when you are sewing more than one.
Use Clever Clips to keep all the parts of the baskets together when you are sewing more than one.

 

With all these pieces in play, it can be a bit confusing on the trip from the cutting table to the sewing machine. Once you have all the components cut, clip them together with a Clever Clip. These come in two sizes. I like using the large ones to keep all the pieces together for a quilt block or a bag.

  • Once you have all the parts cut, fuse interfacing to the main fabric.
  • Set up your sewing machine for free motion quilting (FMQ). I drew wavy FMQ lines along the fabric because it’s quick and cute. You can pick whatever style of FMQ you like.
  • Quilt both outer basket panels.
  • Pin them together, and using a 1/2-inch seam allowance, sew along three sides.
Match the side seams to the bottom seam of the basket.
Match the side seams to the bottom seam of the basket.

 

Sew across the line you've drawn 2 inches from the corner of the basket, and clip off the excess.
Sew across the line you’ve drawn 2 inches from the corner of the basket, and clip off the excess.

 

  • Match the side seam to the bottom seam. Press with steam. Measure 2 inches from the corner (see photo) Draw a horizontal line across the seam.
  • Sew along the line. Clip off the corner, leaving a 1/4-inch seam allowance. Repeat for the other corner.
  • Turn right side out, push out corners.
  • Repeat for the lining, but leave a 5-inch opening along the bottom for turning.
  • Right sides together, sew the lining to the main basket along the top edge.
  • Turn right side out, pulling the main basket through the lining. Push out the corners of the lining, then push the lining into the basket.
  • Even the top edge of the basket and lining, pinning as you go. Press well with steam.
  • Top stitch the top edge of the basket. If the corners aren’t robust enough for your liking, tack a tiny stitch at each corner.
The baskets help make the shelves in the Studio Collection Sewing and Design Table organized and optimized.
The baskets help make the shelves in the Studio Collection Sewing and Design Table organized and optimized.

 

I found that fusible batting produced a more robust basket, but it was harder to sew together than traditional batting. Either way, these are cute and useful containers. I plan to make more for gift giving. How cute would these be filled with cookies or homemade scones?

Also, you’ve done some scrap busting, and there’s nothing wrong with that. As we all know, the more scraps used, the more fabric we can acquire. It’s a win-win.

Speaking of scones, it’s time to fire up the oven and make some. My crafty pals are itching to come over to test drive the Studio Collection Sewing and Design Table from HA Kidd.

My time on QUILTsocial is over for now. It’s been a blast getting organized, and quite literally making this space to create.

I hope the rhyme  ‘A tisket a tasket, this sewing table needs some baskets’ isn’t going to rattle around in your head for too long. Next month, we’re doing some hand quilting and embroidery work on a sweet little mini quilt with a springtime theme. Until then, make a mess and have some handmade fun!

 

Nancy Devine is a self-confessed craft-crazed blogger. She is a regular contributor to A Needle Pulling Thread Magazine, one of the administrators for The Craft Café, a Facebook page devoted to the international sharing of the creative life, and a curator of an impressive collection of fabrics, notions and seam rippers. In her spare time, she wrangles dust bunnies and writes a blog called Nancy Dee Needleworks. Understandably, her house is a mess.

3 Comments

  1. Rebecca K.

    These would be great for organization!

  2. Lori Morton

    Looooove these baskets! Thank you for sharing the Tutorial!! 🙂

  3. mary jo mosier

    I adore this, so cute!! Would love to try this 😀

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