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Banyan Batiks Shadows: a great background fabric for a modern quilt

 

Hello and welcome back! Here we are on day 4 of this week’s project. I hope you didn’t find working on the bias too hazardous, and that you were careful with your bias edges. We finished the day by pressing and squaring off our awesome blocks, let’s piece all of our blocks together and start quilting! 

As I was getting ready for today and cutting the background fabric, I was admiring it. It was a great choice. It’s light enough that it makes a subtle background color, allowing the other colors to stand out and shine. This background batik has enough pattern to give it some interest without overtaking the space.  

I look forward to finishing this modern quilt that showcases Northcott’s Banyan Batiks fabric collections.

 

Northcott’s Banyan Batiks fabric: the Shadows collection
Northcott’s Banyan Batiks fabric: the Shadows collection

 

Over the past 2 days we’ve sewed 4 log cabin blocks then halved them by cutting each block diagonally. Then we sewed each of the log cabin block halves to a piece of background fabric to make 8 blocks in total.

 

Half Log Cabin block paired with background fabric.
Half Log Cabin block paired with background fabric.

 

Now, we’ll take all of the pieces of the Shadows collection fabric that we cut earlier this week and join them to all of the blocks.  

I’ve been playing with the blocks’ placement on my design wall and was pleasantly surprised when I saw the overall effect. Design walls are so useful; they allow us to instantly see what’s really going on with our design concept. You’ll instantly see if the elements gel, where some need to be changed around, and what is or isn’t working.

I was expecting a bolder, brighter look to this quilt, but find that I really like its calm, appeasing look. It will have many aspects that a modern quilt should have such as:

  • no border
  • lots of negative space
  • linear quilting

 

Quilt blocks layout on design wall.
Quilt blocks layout on design wall.

 

Once you find a block placement you like, you can sew the rest of the background fabric pieces into rows as follows:

 

Row

Half Triangle Block Quantity

18¾” x 18¾”

Background Blocks Quantity

18¾” x 18¾”

Other Pieces Quantity

4½” x 18¾”

1

1

2

1

2

1

2

1

3

2

1

1

4

3

 0

1

After the rows are sewed, sew the rows together.

 

Completed quilt top.
Completed quilt top.

 

With the quilt top completed, it’s now quilting time!

We need 3½ yards of fabric for the backing and package of double size batting.

For this quilt, I’m using Fairfield Low-Loft Quilt Batting – Double – 81″ x 96″. This is a Poly-Fil Low-Loft quilt batting. The batting will retain its loft wash after wash and dries quickly. Something else I enjoy about this batting is that because it’s lightweight it’s ideal when you don’t want to add much additional weight to your project. This is true when making a baby quilt or when your quilt top is already large and heavy.

Fairfield battings are also available in the following sizes:

  • Crib – 45” x 60”
  • Double – 81″ x 96”
  • Queen – 90” x 108”
  • King – 120” x 120”

 

Fairfield Low-loft quilt batting.
Fairfield Low-loft quilt batting.

 

Since this quilt measures 60½” X 75” before quilting, I decided that I’d go ahead and quilt it on my own domestic sewing machine.

Another aspect I like about modern quilting is the quilting itself. I love the use of straight lines, curves or even geometric designs for the quilting.

I’ll quilt in straight lines, ½” apart using a thread that will blend nicely with the background fabric.

 

Preview of the quilting that will take place on the quilt.
Preview of the quilting that will take place on the quilt.

 

While you finish your quilt top, prepare the backing and baste your quilt. Here’s a photo to tease you along and show how the straight-line quilting will look.

Come on back tomorrow for the grand finale and see how all these fabrics from the Northcott Banyan Batiks collections will look once the quilt has done its magic!

 

This is part 4 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 3: Safely working on the bias: making a half log cabin block

Go to part 5: Adding interest with linear quilting that isn’t so linear

I took my first quilting course in September 1994 in Barrie, Ontario, near the armed forces base where I was stationed. After moving to Ottawa in 1996, I joined my first guild. I took more courses and began to buy quilting books and lots of fabrics. Quilting has become my passion. I have made over 150 more quilts since then, and have never looked back. I now share my knowledge of quilting by teaching and doing presentations, and blogging!

2 Comments

  1. NancyB from Many LA

    Wow! This is such a different look than I’m used to! This has definitely broadened my outlook – I will try one!

  2. Ellee

    Love, love, love the background fabric!

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