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How to mount a quilted piece on an artist canvas

 

Yesterday I showed you how to make the blocks for your modern button quilt. Now, let’s put everything together to create this little quilt.

  • Sew the blocks together, alternating block 1 and block 2.
  • Sew a 6½” x 12½” black border strip to each side.
  • Sew a 6½” x 20½” black border strip to the top and bottom.

 

Sew on the black borders
Sew on the black borders

 

 

Use a variegated rayon thread and straight-line quilting.for an attractive finish.
Use a variegated rayon thread and straight-line quilting.for an attractive finish.

 

When the quilting is finished, it’s time to sew on the buttons. Did you know you could sew on buttons by machine? You probably have a button sewing foot in your box of sewing machine attachments. It looks like this.

 

Button sewing foot
Button sewing foot

 

Read the instructions in your machine manual for sewing on buttons – every machine is a little bit different.

Sew a button in the center of each block using the button sewing foot. Of course, you could also sew them on by hand if you wish.

 

Use a button sewing foot for a fast way to sew on buttons.
Use a button sewing foot for a fast way to sew on buttons.

 

If you’re sewing on a binding, you can do that now.

If you want to mount your quilt on a stretcher frame, here’s what you need to do:

  • Measure the quilt and the stretcher frame.
  • Trim the quilt so you have enough fabric to go around the back of the frame.
  • Serge or machine overcast the cut edges.
  • Staple the quilt to the stretcher frame, on all 4 sides and leaving the corners un-stapled for now.

 

Staple the edges to the stretcher frame first.
Staple the edges to the stretcher frame first.

 

  • At the corners, trim off some of the lining fabric and batting, so the corners won’t be too bulky and will fold more easily.
  • Fold the corners over the frame and staple in place.

 

Cut away some of the backing and batting in the corners.
Cut away some of the backing and batting in the corners.

 

You could staple another piece of fabric to cover up the back, but it’s really ready to hang on the wall just as it is.

 

Finished button quilt on an artist's canvas stretcher frame
Finished button quilt on an artist’s canvas stretcher frame

 

Come back tomorrow and we’ll get started on another little button quilt using purple buttons from a “Bottle o’ Buttons” jar.

 

Purple buttons for our next project
Purple buttons for our next project

 

 

 

This is part 3 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 2: For the love of buttons – making a modern button quilt

Go to part 4: Using buttons instead of applique for a small quilt!

 

Jean has been designing and publishing patterns since 1997. For the past 10 years she has been designing patterns for new fabric collections by Northcott Fabrics. Her work has been published in several magazines in both Canada and the United States. Jean holds a Fiber Arts Certificate in quilting and has taught extensively throughout Canada, including six national Quilt Canada conferences. She was named "Canadian Teacher of the Year" in 2003 by the Canadian Quilters Association and has won numerous awards for her quilts.

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