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Making a quilter’s badge extra special using font and floating stitches

This week I’ve been exploring some of the stitching techniques available on the NEW PFAFF quilt expression 720. In yesterday’s post, I started to make a quilter’s name badge. I listed the fabric requirements based on my badge and invited you to join me! Today I’ll show you how I completed my name badge.

Quilter's name badge with PFAFF quilt expression 720
Quilter’s name badge with PFAFF quilt expression 720

I added the fabric to the sides of the center of the badge first. I thought it would be fun to add some floating stitches that look like dots to go with the fabric. I used black thread and sewed the fabrics to the sides using the floating stitches. Since there was already stabilizer on the back of the centerpiece from stitching out my name, I didn’t add another piece.

The reverse side of floating stitches created with PFAFF quilt expression 720.
Reverse side of floating stitches

Once stitched, I gently tugged the fabrics apart to bring them to the front. I love how this works!

The front of the floating stitches are a fun addition to the project. Using the NEW PFAFF quilt expression 720 to make a quilter's badge.
Front side of floating stitches after tugging fabrics

I used floating stitches to attach the other side piece of fabric then stitched the top and bottom fabrics using a regular stitch.

Then it was time to start assembling the quilt sandwich starting with the batting on the bottom and my backing fabric right side up on top. I pinned both ends of my ribbon in the middle of the top edge of the badge and also pinned the long loop to the middle of the badge to prevent it from getting caught in my seams.

I don’t usually put a pin in the middle and only did it because my ribbon is quite stiff and I wanted it to stay tucked. I was very careful when turning my project and made sure to remove the pin as soon as it was visible from pushing the fabrics to the right side.

Securely pin the ribbon ends in place on the edge of the badge and the rest of the ribbon in the center of the backing so it doesn't get caught while stitching the layers together. Using the NEW PFAFF quilt expression 720
Ribbon is securely pinned before layering for quilting.

The final layer of the quilting sandwich is the front of the name badge. Here you can see I pinned around the edges and left a turning gap along one of the bottom edges where there’s no seam; the two pins close together are where I’ll stop stitching.

The layers are pinned together leaving a turning gap. Using the NEW PFAFF quilt expression 720 to make a quilter's badge.
Quilter’s name badge layers pinned together.

After the layers are sewn together, I turned the badge right side out. I use a gadget to push the fabric for the corners out. Then I used an orange thread for my stitching to go with my ribbon. I topstitched and echo quilted in the novelty print to complete the quilter’s name badge.

Topstitching and echo quilting in the novelty print complete the quilter's name badge. Using the NEW PFAFF quilt expression 720
Quilter’s name badge finished

I’m looking forward to wearing my name badge at my next quilt guild meeting! The PFAFF quilt expression 720 helped me bring this project to life and definitely inspired me to create some more.

This is part 4 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 3: Making a quilter’s name badge using the PFAFF quilt expression 720

Go to part 5: Can anything be more fun than Stacking Stitches??

I love to play with color and *quilts* are my playground! A self-taught quilter, I've been designing quilts for almost 20 years. I'm inspired by happy fabrics, selvages, traditional blocks and nature. I'm also a wife, mother, and elementary school teacher, and enjoy drinking coffee on my front porch in northern Ontario.

1 Comment

  1. Shirley Jobson

    Well isn’t that the coolest of cool!! Great work!

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