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Quilting and crafting with sensational Sulky Stabilizers

This week, all 5 days I get the privilege of discussing the most amazing Sulky Stabilizers with so much exciting project potential.

 

You can sew, craft, quilt and embroider with these fantastic Sulky products.

 

Projects for this week are shown below, make a basket, make your own textiles, applique circles and English paper piece all with Sulky Stabilizers. Who knew you could do this with ease?

 

awesome Sulky Stabilizer projects to be discussed this week.
via: quiltingintheloft.com

 

In the past, I have done my fair share of embroidery. I really got into a habit of thinking that stabilizers such as Sulky Paper SolvySulky Ultra Solvy and Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch were just for the embroidery world, not so!

This week I’m showing you 4 awesome projects that could be considered crafting, sewing or quilting and not embroidery. Don’t get me wrong, these stabilizers are also awesome for embroidery but they also have multiple other uses.

Today, I’m excited to discuss Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch, a cut-away permanent stabilizer that’s fusible, has a soft hand and excellent stability to provide structure to a basket. The basket project I’m talking about today has the look of the jelly roll rugs that is all the craze right now but I was able to use Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch to make a basket in a similar manner.

This basket would be a great decor addition to your home or sewing room. It’s also a great way to use Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch and have a very useful vessel to store stuff while using up some of your fabric stash.

 

Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch, 24″ x 36″ package used in this basket project.

 

Note: Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch is also conveniently available in  24″ x 36″ package, 8″ x 8yd roll, 20″ x 5yd roll and 24″x 25yd bolt. Be sure to ask for it at your local sewing/quilting retailers.

 

Basket made using Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch Cut-Away Permanent Stabilizer
via: quiltingintheloft.com

 

materials to make one basket

  • Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch Cut-Away Permanent Stabilizer (used for project 24″ x 36″ package). Cut all into 2½” strips.
  • thread to match your project
  • top stitch or jeans needle size 90
  • macrame cord (available at local discount craft supply store) or cotton clothesline cord.
    • Why I used macrame cord? I found a large roll of macrame cord at a local crafting warehouse supply retailer for only $10.99 and thought why not give it a try and it worked. It is also very durable. You could also use cotton clothesline, found at local hardware stores.
  • assortment of 2½” fabric strips (cotton)- approximately 8 width of fabric
  • 2 – 8 x 2½” fabric strips for handles
  • sewing machine able to make a zigzag stitch
  • open toe foot to allow zigzag stitch
  • iron set to no steam setting
  • 4 buttons for handles
  • UNIQUE QUILTING Clever Clips (optional, but super handy!)

sewing instructions- Part 1

  • Cut all of the Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch into 2½” strips along the 36″ length, cut 2 – 8 x 2½” strips for handles (set aside).
  • Cut 8 strips of cotton fabric 2½” x width of fabric.
  • Sew these strips right sides together with a ¼” seam allowance along the 2½” ends so that you have one continuous length of fabric strips.
  • Press your seams open on the fabric strips.
  • Prepare your fabric strips by pressing the fusible side of the Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch to the wrong side of your fabric strips overlapping ¼” where the ends of the Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch meet.

TIP Use your iron on the non steam setting when fusing the Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch stabilizer to the wrong side of the fabric strips.

 

Ironing the Fuse ‘n Stitch Stabilizer to the fabric.

 

  • Iron the entire length of the Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch and fabric strips in half along the length, fold one side into the center and the other side into the center, fold folded edges up towards each other. Press well. You should now have an approximately ⅝” strip of folded and stabilized fabric.
  • Clip the edges every 6″ with UNIQUE QUILTING Clever Clips to hold the ironed and folded strips together. Refer to photos below:

 

Fabric strip prepared with Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch, ironed in the center along the length and one side pressed towards the center.

 

 

Fabric strip prepared with Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch, ironed in the center along the length and two sides pressed towards the center.

 

 

Fabric Strips prepared with Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch and folded sides pressed towards each other and clipped with UNIQUE QUILTING Clever Clips. Ready to go for basket making.

 

  • Sew your basket base with a zigzag stitch and matching thread, start with a 1″ length of macrame cord (or cord of your choosing).
  • Coil the cord in a clockwise direction tightly together and zigzag stitch the sides butted together tightly until the coiled circle is approximately 8½” in diameter. See photo below.
TIP Use a 5.5mm zigzag stitch or the largest your machine can do in order to catch all edges of fabric.

 

Macrame cord

 

 

Continuing on with macrame basket base coil in a clockwise fashion.

 

 

Basket base is getting bigger, changed to navy thread to make stitches less obvious.

 

 

Basket base is completed with macrame cord.

 

  • Cut off the tail of the macrame cord and zigzag the edge to prevent fraying, leave a loose tail of about 4″ to attach to the Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch prepared fabric strips.

Join me tomorrow to see part 2 of this fascinating project and how to add the fabric strips to the base of the basket and to complete it. I assure you, you’ll not be disappointed. The completed basket is very firm and very useful and easy to make with Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch.

 

This is part 1 of 5 in this series.

Robin Bogaert is a long arm quilter, creator and blogger at quiltingintheloft.com and has many years of quilting experience. Robin was the past owner of a quilt shop in Windsor, Ontario and now resides in Waterloo. Robin's roots in quilting are traditional, however she appreciates modern quilt design as well and considers the focus of work to be designing, teaching, trunk shows, free motion quilting, ruler work and thread painting. In addition to her passion for sharing all things quilting, Robin is busy with pattern design and sells her patterns on her website and with Craftsy.com. Robin was featured in the Summer 2016 and 2017 (Canada 150th) edition of Quilters’ Connection Magazine and is a new guest contributor at QUILTsocial.com.

2 Comments

  1. Nancy

    This is a really interesting design idea. Thanks for sharing.

    • You are welcome Nancy, I hope you enjoy this weeks posts.

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