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Easy baby quilt pattern you can make in a day (Part 1)

 

We’re all set for an easy baby quilt pattern you can make in a day.

Yesterday I gave your 5 tips to help you make a quick baby quilt. In today’s post, I want to share one of my favorite easy baby quilt pattern you can make in a day!

 

We’re all set for an easy baby quilt pattern you can make in a day with the PFAFF creative icon
We’re all set for an easy baby quilt pattern you can make in a day with the PFAFF creative icon

 

But before we start on a new project, here’s another trick I have for smooth piecing.

When I start a new project, I change my needle and clean my machine. If you’re using the PFAFF creative icon, it’s strongly recommended to use the INSPIRA Quilting Needle, size 75 when piecing (using a 50wt thread) and the INSPIRA Quilting Needle, size 90 when quilting (using a 30wt or 40 wt thread).

INSPIRA Quilting Needles have a special tapered point and light ballpoint to sew through layers and batting with ease so you’re sure to have a perfect stitch all the time.

 

Remember to change needles every 15 hours of use
Remember to change needles every 15 hours of use

 

The PFAFF creative icon comes with a cool gadget that really helps us change our needles in no time. I really love using this tool to insert the needle. It keeps it in position until I’m done tightening the screw.

Remember to change needles every 15 hours of use… or sooner if you hear that it isn’t running smoothly.

Now let’s get started with cutting the fabrics.

I used the wonderful Sleepy Sloth collection from Northcott. Keep in mind that the quilt size is 45″ x 60″.

materials

fabric

⅛ yd yellow fabric

¾ yd navy fabric

¼ yd teal fabric

2¾ yds dot fabric

½ yd for binding

3 yds* for backing

*Note: I had ½ yd of the teal and yellow fabrics so I used leftovers in an improvised backing. I only needed an extra yard of navy fabric for the backing. See Friday’s blog for more details on the backing.

 

Cutting the fabrics for project
Cutting the fabrics for project

 

cutting instructions

yellow fabric

Cut one (1) 2½” strips, then cut:

  • three (3) 2½” squares (A)

navy fabric

Cut eight (8) 2½” strips, then cut:

  • Six (6) 2½” squares (B)
  • Six (6) 2½” x 6½” rectangles (C)
  • Six (6) 2½” x 10½” rectangles (F)
  • Six (6) 2½” x 14½” rectangles (G)
  • Set two (2) 2½” strips aside (K)

teal fabric

Cut three (3) 2½” strips, then cut:

  • Two (2) 2½” squares (H)
  • Six (6) 2½” x 6½” rectangles (D)
  • Four (4) 2½” x 10½” rectangles (E)

dot fabrics

  • Cut one (1) 2½” strips, then cut:
    • Two (2) 2½” x 10½” rectangles (I)
    • Two (2) 2½” x 6½” rectangles (J)
  • Cut four (4) 6½” strips (L)
  • Cut one (1) 60½” strip, then cut:
    • One (1) 7½” x 60½” rectangle (M)
    • One (1) 10½” x 60½” rectangle (N)

INSTRUCTIONS

 

Accurate piecing with PFAFF creative icon
Accurate piecing with PFAFF creative icon

 

For more accuracy when piecing, I’m still using the straight stitch needle plate on the machine, which is part of the accessories included with the PFAFF creative icon. The smaller hole in the Straight Stitch Needle Plate supports the fabric closer to the needle and helps prevent the fabric from being pulled down into the bobbin area, especially at the beginning and end of a seam. And I used the integrated dual feed system which means that your top and bottom fabrics are being fed through at the same time, preventing your layers from shifting while sewing and ensuring a precise piecing.

BLOCK A

STEP 1

  • Sew two (2) B squares to one (1) A square
  • Makes a 2½” x 6½” rectangle
  • Repeat to make two (2)

 

Block A Step 1
Block A Step 1

 

STEP 2

  • Sew two (2) C rectangles on top and bottom of Step 1 rectangle
  • Makes a 6½” square
  • Repeat to make two (2)

 

Bloc A Step 2
Bloc A Step 2

 

STEP 3

  • Sew two (2) D rectangles on left and right of Step 2 square
  • Makes a 6½” x 10½” rectangle
  • Repeat to make two (2)

STEP 4

  • Sew two (2) E rectangles on top and bottom of Step 3 rectangle
  • Makes a 10½” square
  • Repeat to make two (2)

 

Block A Step 3 and 4
Block A Step 3 and 4

 

STEP 5

  • Sew two (2) F rectangles on left and right of Step 4 square
  • Makes a 10½” x 14½” rectangle
  • Repeat to make two (2)

STEP 6

  • Sew two (2) G rectangles on top and bottom of Step 5 rectangle
  • Makes a 14½” square
  • Repeat to make two (2)

 

Block A step 5 and 6
Block A step 5 and 6

 

Block B

STEP 1

  • Sew two (2) H squares to one (1) A square
  • Makes a 2½” x 6½” rectangle

 

Block B Step 1
Block B Step 1

 

STEP 2

  • Sew two (2) D rectangles on top and bottom of Step 1 rectangle
  • Makes a 6½” square

 

Block B Step 2
Block B Step 2

 

STEP 3

  • Sew two (2) C rectangles on left and right of Step 2 square
  • Makes a 6½” x 10½” rectangle

STEP 4

  • Sew two (2) F rectangles on top and bottom of Step 3 rectangle
  • Makes a 10½” square

 

Block B Step 3 and 4
Block B Step 3 and 4

 

STEP 5

  • Sew two (2) F rectangles on left and right of Step 4 square
  • Makes a 10½” x 14½” rectangle
  • Repeat to make two (2)

STEP 6

  • Sew two (2) G rectangles on top and bottom of Step 5 rectangle
  • Makes a 14½” square
  • Repeat to make two (2)

 

Block B Step 6
Block B Step 6

 

STEP 7

  • Sew two step 6 rectangles on top and bottom of Step 5 rectangle
  • Makes a 14½” square

 

Block B Step 7
Block B Step 7

 

Congratulations! Your blocks are done.

See how easy this baby quilt pattern is? Join me tomorrow, I’ll show you how to assemble the quilt top using the PFAFF creative icon!

 

This is part 3 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 2: 5 essential tips for quickly finishing a baby quilt

Go to part 4: Easy baby quilt pattern you can make in a day (Part 2)

Married with three young boys, Claire Haillot shares her passion for quilting among her neighbors in the United States and Canada as well as her cousins in France. Claire has been active in the quilting industry since 2004. At first, she opened a quilt shop and started to teach, write how-to guides and translate patterns and product information into French for American companies. In 2006, she started her own line of patterns and later began publishing patterns and articles in Canadian, European and American magazines. You might have seen some of her work in Quilter’s World, Pratique du Patchwork or Canadian Quilter. She decided to close her brick & mortar quilt shop in 2016 to be able to concentrate more on teaching, writing and creating. She collaborated with PlumEasy patterns to launch the Dancing Diamonds and Gem bag patterns. Claire has also won a few awards for her work: • Juror’s choice at the Salon 2012 for her quilt Thomas goes fishing • Second Place in Vermont Quilt Festival of 2014 for her quilt Bienvenue • Second Place in Salon 2016 for her Lone Star quilt, and • Second Place in Vermont Quilt Festival 2016 for her quilt Remembering Sotchi. Her quilt Remembering Sotchi will be part of the Special Exhibit "A Celebration of Color" at the Quilt Festival in Chicago and Houston in 2018.

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