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Fabric Journal Cover COLLAGE

As I mentioned yesterday in the Fabric Journal Cover Tutorial, I’m a bit obsessive about making stuff, hence the Fabric Journal Cover Collage.

I’ve always played and experimented, and took an idea and exhausted all possible options. While I may not have exhausted all options – I’m going to share with you a lot of different ways to modify the basic journal cover that was covered in yesterday’s tutorial. There are some tricks, some crazy ideas and some very good ideas for using up stuff.

Sit back and enjoy – but I’m issuing a challenge. Put your creative hat on – find something around your sewing room that you can use up. Make a journal cover and send me a picture. I would love to post it.

My daughter saw my first journal cover and said she would love to have a cover for her journal. No problem. Let's give it a whirl.
My daughter saw my first journal cover and said she would love to have a cover for her journal. No problem. Let’s give it a whirl.

 

Because this is so important, I'm covering it again. To get the measurements for your journal - DO NOT measure like this.
Because this is so important, I’m covering it again. To get the measurements for your journal – DO NOT measure like this.

 

Instead, wrap the measuring tape around the CLOSED journal. You can see that the coil binding adds ONE FULL INCH to the measurement.
Instead, wrap the measuring tape around the CLOSED journal. You can see that the coil binding adds ONE FULL INCH to the measurement.

 

The importance of measuring properly when making a fabric journal cover.
The importance of measuring properly when making a fabric journal cover.

 

In case you’re wondering what happens if you get the incorrect size… my friend Linda made a journal cover and did not measure the correct way. When she slipped the journal cover on her journal, the journal would not close. There wasn’t enough room in the cover to accommodate the coil binding.

Not daunted, Linda slashed the back of the journal cover and added in a piece. oops – she had to do that three times before it was the right size. Hence the importance of measuring the correct way the first time!  (Thanks for sharing that story Linda)

M (my daughter) wanted a collage for her journal cover. How much fun to shop in Mom's stash. The first thing she chose was the background for the collage.
M (my daughter) wanted a collage for her journal cover. How much fun to shop in Mom’s stash. The first thing she chose was the background for the collage.

 

She even went as far as ironing the background fabric. No - could she actually be wanting to stitch this out?
She even went as far as ironing the background fabric. No – could she actually be wanting to stitch this out?

 

Next up - choosing the fabrics to use for the collage. A LOT of fun to shop in Mom's stash.
Next up – choosing the fabrics to use for the collage. A LOT of fun to shop in Mom’s stash.

 

Cut the backing and the heavy weight fusible interfacing for the journal cover.
Cut the backing and the heavy weight fusible interfacing for the journal cover.

 

Fuse the interfacing to the wrong side of the journal cover. I find that I have to use a higher temperature and definitely steam to get good adhesion for the interfacing. Make sure it's well adhered everywhere, especially the edges.
Fuse the interfacing to the wrong side of the journal cover. I find that I have to use a higher temperature and definitely steam to get good adhesion for the interfacing. Make sure it’s well adhered everywhere, especially the edges.

 

The collage pieces waiting to be positioned. Stand back and consider its placement.
The collage pieces waiting to be positioned. Stand back and consider its placement.

 

Everything is in place and ready to stitch.
Everything is in place and ready to stitch.

 

Gluing down the pieces for the fabric journal cover collage.
Gluing down the pieces for the fabric journal cover collage.

 

We chose raw edge applique for this piece. No fusible web was used, but I needed to hold the pieces in place while I stitched (yes me – I couldn’t convince M to do the stitching although she knows how to operate a sewing machine). I also didn’t want to use pins, so I put dabs of glue on the back of each piece – enough to hold them down while I stitched. Worked like a charm – nothing moved. Which is important when you’re making something for someone else and they have things exactly where they want.

Remember this cover was for my teenage daughter – we cannot have shifting pieces – that would throw the piece off balance!

The lining of the fabric journal cover.
The lining of the fabric journal cover.

 

At last ready to assemble the journal cover. See the two end pieces which form the pockets for the cover of the journal to slip into. The middle piece provides a nice clean finish along the top and bottom of the journal cover.

The lining and how to fix a mistake in the fabric journal cover.
The lining and how to fix a mistake in the fabric journal cover.

 

For the inside of the journal cover, M wanted 3 different fabrics. Not a problem, just a couple extra seams. Never mind that I had to rip one of them out because I sewed it upside down! What was even worse is that I can’t do math. Do you see that extra little bit – when I had the 3 inside pieces laid out – the center piece was too narrow.

A leftover bit of the map fabric was lying on the cutting table and so it got put into service. I was not going to cut and piece more of the 3 fabrics. Besides – this extra bit is behind the journal cover. No one will know that I goofed.

Outside of the fabric journal cover collage.
Outside of the fabric journal cover collage.

 

I dropped the feed dogs on the Husqvarna Viking H|Class 100Q and put the darning foot on.

M had chosen three thread colors – a metallic gold, a brown and a burgundy. I added beige and then I just stitched. Some of the lines are just straight lines (but stitched free motion), I outlined pieces and basically had a great time. The H|Class 100Q had no problem dealing with any of the stitching or thread choices.

Ta-da! The finished fabric journal cover collage.
Ta-da! The finished fabric journal cover collage.

 

M was very pleased with it – a collaborative effort between mom and daughter. I must say that I was very happy with it as well.

One word of caution – when you lay out your elements – make sure to measure to ensure they fit within the confines of your journal cover.  We almost lost a couple of elements because we were so excited – we didn’t take that into account.

M with her completed journal cover. Thanks M for helping out. Maybe next time you will actually stitch it yourself.
M with her completed journal cover. Thanks M for helping out. Maybe next time you will actually stitch it yourself.

 

Linda's journal cover.
Linda’s journal cover.

 

In case you were wondering what Linda put on the front of her journal cover…

This is a replica of a mini quilt that Linda made a while ago. She gave the mini quilt away, but now she has a super reminder of one of her favorite pieces. Linda – thanks again for sharing.

There you have it – a great way to get your kids involved in the sewing process by making something for them and designed by them. This is definitely a project that kids could have a lot of fun with. How about getting them to design a journal cover and they could write about their summer? Replicating a piece of child’s artwork would also make a super journal cover.

I hope you enjoyed our journal cover collage. Tomorrow I will run through the other techniques and journal cover enhancements that I came up with. Can’t wait to see what you do with them and to see what other great ideas you can figure out.

Have a great day!

Ciao!

PS – My daughter has requested that I make her another fabric journal cover collage. Of course – this one for her Christmas journal. Hey M – better start shopping in my stash!

Elaine Theriault is a teacher, writer and pattern designer who is completely obsessed with quilting. Elaine’s Tech Tips column (originally published in A Needle Pulling Thread magazine) is now available online in e-book format at QUILTsocial.com. When not quilting, she enjoys spending time with her two dogs, Lexi and Murphy, or can be found cycling across the country. Her blog is crazyquilteronabike.blogspot.com.

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