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Finishing a craft basket with Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch for stability

Happy Tuesday, yesterday I started to discuss Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch the fusible stabilizer with great stability used to make an amazing basket. This basket is very useful to organize sewing supplies, knitting supplies, craft supplies, magazines and so much more. We all need a place to store our never-ending supply of stuff and have something that fits our decor.

Please refer to yesterday’s post Quilting and crafting with sensational Sulky Stabilizers for Part 1 of how to make the basket pictured below. See how to make the base of the basket with macrame cord and prepare fabric strips with the fantastic Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch Stabilizer.

 

Working with Sulky Stabilizers all week, let’s get to know each one while making a project.

 

The next steps are so much fun, so easy and you get to see your basket grow and grow.

 

Basket made from Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch

 

Sewing instructions – Part 2, completing a basket with Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch.

  • Cut and taper one end of the fabric strips as shown below, cut back on an angle on either side of the strip about 2″ and leave about a ½” tip that is folded to the wrong side. Re-press the strip to a smaller tapered tip. See below photo.

 

Cut down each side as shown about 2″ and leave a ½” tip which is pressed to the wrong side. Re-press as discussed, folding raw edges towards the center.

 

  • Attach the fabric strip to the end of the macrame cord with a zigzag stitch and the single folded edge facing up towards the top of the basket. The two folded edges should face down towards the base.

 

Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch fabric strip attached to base of basket.

 

  • Using a 5.5 mm zigzag stitch (or largest your machine can do) and coordinating thread, carefully butt the fabric cord around the macrame base holding it up vertically as you go at your sewing machine and zigzag sew to attach through all layers. See photo below.

 

Zigzag stitching the stabilized fabric cord to base cord.

 

 

Keep going with the zigzag stitch and butting seems while holding the basket up to the left of the needle plate.

 

 

Keep going until the last Fuse ‘n Stitch stabilized strip is used up.

 

  • Taper the last strip of fabric as you did the first one to completely join your strips to your basket.
  • Make some handles with 2 – 8″ x 2½” strips of fabric stabilized with Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch, fold and press as you did all of the basket strips, press ends in ¼” towards the wrong side of fabric and top stitch. See photo below.

 

Handles prepared with Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch, top stitched

 

  • Using a top stitch or denim needle in your machine attach your handles evenly on both sides of your basket using a cross stitch and cover this with a decorative button. Refer to photos below.

TIP Go slowly so you don’t break needles as you sew through many layers of fabric. You can also glue the button on top of the cross stitch or stitch by hand as preferred.

 

Cross stitch to attach handles

 

 

Buttons added on top of cross stitch.

 

  • Admire your efforts!

 

A great storage basket made with Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch.
via: quiltingintheloft.com

 

There are endless uses for Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch including:

  • embroidery
  • stitching designs on heavyweight fabric
  • dense embroidery designs
  • applique, handwork, home decor items and so much more!

It’s wonderful to have bubble-free adhering while you work with Sulky Fuse ‘n Stitch. As you can see with the basket project, it’s a wonderful smooth, permanent structured stabilizer.

Join me tomorrow when I discuss Paper Solvy, yet another exciting product from Sulky’s line of stabilizers. I’ll show you an easy applique technique for those normally challenging circles using Paper Solvy as a stabilizer to make your applique ‘sew’ easy and achieve the look of hand applique by machine.

 

This is part 2 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 1: Quilting and crafting with sensational Sulky Stabilizers

Robin Bogaert is a long arm quilter, creator and blogger at quiltingintheloft.com and has many years of quilting experience. Robin was the past owner of a quilt shop in Windsor, Ontario and now resides in Waterloo. Robin's roots in quilting are traditional, however she appreciates modern quilt design as well and considers the focus of work to be designing, teaching, trunk shows, free motion quilting, ruler work and thread painting. In addition to her passion for sharing all things quilting, Robin is busy with pattern design and sells her patterns on her website and with Craftsy.com. Robin was featured in the Summer 2016 and 2017 (Canada 150th) edition of Quilters’ Connection Magazine and is a new guest contributor at QUILTsocial.com.

2 Comments

  1. Janie McCombs

    I love it. Thank you for sharing.

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