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How coloring your fabric meets up with a fabulous quilting experience

 

Yesterday I talked about the fabulous ways to use FABRIC FUN Fabric Markers including some basic information on how to prepare the fabric for coloring.

Today I’ll use a printed fabric to show you how this helps you to learn and develop coloring skills. For this technique, I’m using two fabrics from Black and White With a Dash of Color by Northcott.

 

Northcott Black and White with a Dash of Color- black background
Northcott Black and White with a Dash of Color- black background

 

Ready, Set, Color!

There are endless possibilities for coloring on print fabrics.

Black and white prints are the easiest to learn on because they give clear boundaries to work with.

It’s kind of like having a coloring book on fabric, all ready for you to add your personal touch.

 

NORTHCOTT Black and White with a Dash of Color-line print
NORTHCOTT Black and White with a Dash of Color-line print

 

As I mentioned in yesterday’s post, FABRIC FUN Fabric Markers come in a wide variety of colors both bright and primary.

Choosing which one to use first is probably the hardest part.

An easy way to start is to use a single color to completely fill in an area of design. Use the thin tip to get into small areas and the thick tip where you’re working on larger areas.

 

Using a single color for each motif is an easy way to start.
Using a single color for each motif is an easy way to start.

 

If you just want to see what the colors look like you can “go wild” and use them all at once for a whimsical looking design.

 

Go wild with color for a whimsical look
Go wild with color for a whimsical look

 

Using a variety of similar colors within a design can add depth and dimension.

 

Using a variety of colors gives depth to a design
Using a variety of colors gives depth to a design

 

A detailed print gives many design options.

I started by coloring a repeat element with the primary pink.

Use a light touch for limited color saturation or a firm pressure for deeper more intense color.

The fine tip will give a softer appearance while the thick tip instantly gives more ink flow for a deeper richer effect.

 

Isolate and color a single motif for a pop of color
Isolate and color a single motif for a pop of color

 

Uncolored areas of design within a colored area add a touch of light for sparkle and can be also used to add in different colors later.

 

Use a light touch and leave some white showing for sparkle
Use a light touch and leave some white showing for sparkle

 

Use several shades or colors on a single design element for a more detailed three dimensional look.

If you add different colors in areas left previously uncolored each color will remain separate and pure.

Because the FABRIC FUN Fabric Markers are so fast drying you can also layer colors on top of one another creating entirely new color variations.

Here, a little of the bright collection goes a long way.

 

A little bright color goes a long way.
A little bright color goes a long way.

 

Let the pattern on the fabric guide you to color at the correct angle.

I followed the direction of the veins on the leaves and varied the pressure on the pen throughout.
This gives a natural almost painted effect.

 

Follow the pattern to color at an angle to create the impression of depth.
Follow the pattern to color at an angle to create the impression of depth.

 

Continue coloring areas of the design.

Color individual motifs all the same or all different, whatever you find pleasing. You can leave some areas of the design uncolored for an interesting contrast.

 

Leave some of the design uncolored for contrast
Leave some of the design uncolored for contrast

 

Coloring on fabric is just so much fun that I often can’t quit until everything is colored!

Remember to heat set by pressing with a dry iron on cotton setting.

 

Coloring everything to create a one of a kind print.
Coloring everything to create a one of a kind print.

 

You can use your colored fabrics for garments, crafting, quilting and more.

They look great by themselves or combined with the original print.

Come back tomorrow as we use our new coloring skills, FABRIC FUN Fabric Markers and plain fabric to create our own, one of a kind designs.

 

This is part 2 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 1: How to use FABRIC FUN Fabric Markers in your next quilting project

Go to part 3: 5 ways to create your very own fabric designs using fabric markers

Julie Plotniko is a quilting teacher, blogger and designer from Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. Teaching for almost 40 years, recent credits include Quilt Canada 2016 and 2017, many quilt guilds and groups throughout Canada and CreativFestival Sewing and Craft Shows in Victoria, Abbotsford and Toronto. When not on the road Julie works and teaches at Snip & Stitch Sewing Center in Nanaimo, BC. Her favorite things include free motion quilting (standard bed and mid-arm machines), precision piecing, scrap quilting, machine embroidery, blogging, designing and of course teaching. Julie believes that to see a student go from tentative beginnings to having confidence in themselves and their abilities is one of the greatest rewards that life has to offer.

2 Comments

  1. Carolyn Langley

    Thanks for all this great information so far, I’ve been looking for ways to paint on fabric which didn’t mean purchasing expensive paint supplies..did you say where these markers can be purchased?
    Thanks again

    • I’m so happy to hear you’ve found the post useful. The FABRIC FUN fabric markers can be purchased at your local quilt store, or ordered through them. The distributor is H.A. Kidd & Co. Thank you for visiting QUILTsocial!

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