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Making a modern quilt out of traditional log cabin blocks and batiks

 

Happy Tuesday morning!

Hope you’re all set to start this week’s quilt using fabrics from the Northcott Banyan Batiks collection.

 

Northcott Banyan Batiks: Nostalgic Vibes, Primitive Lines and Shadows collections
Northcott Banyan Batiks: Nostalgic Vibes, Primitive Lines and Shadows collections

 

As I mentioned yesterday, this week’s quilt is inspired by the modern quilt trend. In yesterday’s post I talked about how it’s not quite ‘modern’ to use batiks in a modern quilt, it’s more of a guideline than a rule. You know what they say about rules; they’re made to be broken! I used batiks in modern quilts and will continue to do so, because I like batiks and I like modern quilting and with the right design together they make a beautiful quilt! 

With the Northcott Banyan Batiks selected, we’ll make a marvelous modern quilt. Let’s go!

 

Fabrics from the Nostalgic Vibes and Primitive Lines collections
Fabrics from the Nostalgic Vibes and Primitive Lines collections

 

As I mentioned yesterday it’s important to note to pre-wash your batik fabrics. Although I found that the colors of the Northcott Banyan Batiks didn’t bleed much, it’s still a very good idea to pre-wash them.

Here’s a little piece of great-to-know information: as you are aware, most fabrics are typically 40” to 42” wide, the Banyan Batiks fabrics, with selvage, measure 44¾” wide! Therefore, you’ll have 44” of usable width. Those 2 to 4 extra inches will come in very handy.

Now, let’s begin cutting our fabrics!

From each of the Nostalgic Vibes and Primitive Lines fabrics cut two 2¼” strips from each fabric.

 

2¼” fabric strip ready to be cut and sewn.
2¼” fabric strip ready to be cut and sewn.

 

The construction of this quilt is very much like a Log Cabin quilt block. Starting on one side of the center block, sew a strip to each side of the center block until you have 3 strips per side.

From the neutral Shadows fabric cut:

4 19½” x 19½” squares
5 18¾” x 18¾” squares
4 10½” x 10½” squares
4 4½” x 18¾” strips for border
8 2½” strips for binding

Click the link to download a PDF diagram on how to efficiently cut fabric your Shadow fabric.

Here are 2 possible layouts that would work for this quilt.

 

Multiple fabrics used randomly to create a colorful log cabin block.
Multiple fabrics used randomly to create a colorful log cabin block.

 

 

6 fabrics, 3 per side, make a great traditional-looking log cabin block.
6 fabrics, 3 per side, make a great traditional-looking log cabin block.

 

When looking at the above photos, remember that these blocks will be cut in half diagonally; therefore their appearance will change a bit.

Here’s a look at what the 2 halves of block A will look like after the diagonal cut is made.

If using block A, we’ll have to remove a 2½” strip from the center of the block.

 

What the 2 halves will look like using block A.
What the 2 halves will look like using block A.

 

If we cut diagonally down the center of the block we’ll end up with little triangles affecting the block’s symmetry.

 

Cutting diagonally down the center leaves little triangles which affect the symmetry of the block.
Cutting diagonally down the center leaves little triangles which affect the symmetry of the block.

 

For the same reasons as with block A, we’d have to remove a 2½” strip. The 2 halves would then create a very symmetrical look.

 

This variation gives us 2 precise and distinct halves.
This variation gives us 2 precise and distinct halves.

 

Now, to decide which layout you’d prefer for your quilt top.

I’m using block A’s layout since I love using lots of colors in my quilts. Block B, naturally would be my 2nd option as there would be no 2 identical halves.

Click the link to download a pdf file containing the cutting instructions for all three blocks. When your fabrics are cut, feel free to start sewing the blocks together!

Note: DO NOT cut your blocks.We’ll talk about that in tomorrow’s post.

If you’re still unsure which fabrics you wish to use, I’d suggest that you check out the Northcott Banyan Batiks Collections, so much from which to choose!

 

This is part 2 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 1: Using Northcott Banyan Batiks in a modern quilt

Go to part 3: Safely working on the bias: making a half log cabin block

I took my first quilting course in September 1994 in Barrie, Ontario, near the armed forces base where I was stationed. After moving to Ottawa in 1996, I joined my first guild. I took more courses and began to buy quilting books and lots of fabrics. Quilting has become my passion. I have made over 150 more quilts since then, and have never looked back. I now share my knowledge of quilting by teaching and doing presentations, and blogging!

9 Comments

  1. Dawn F.

    This is a really cool idea, and I love the colors of those batiks!

  2. Mary Basten-Zarr

    Great ideas for this new quilter, Thank you!

  3. Beth B

    I like this series and the unique look gives.

  4. Christi

    I must say this looks like fun.

  5. Love batiks and have always LOVED Log Cabin, so will be following along with great interest! Thanks!

  6. Laura McFall

    I love log cabins and these fabrics are perfect!!

  7. Amanda

    Definitely on my to make list!

  8. Sandy Allen

    Oh, love the instructions on how to cut the blocks. I would have never thought about the little piece that is left if you don’t cut it that way!

  9. Linda Williamson

    Love these new Banyan Batiks. I’ve never pre-washed my batiks. What do you recommend if you have pre-cut strips or 5″ squares? Thanks.

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