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My best TIP for assembling quilt blocks

I’m so happy to be sharing my best tip on how to assemble a quilt top. If you’ve been following my earlier posts this week, you’ll remember I’m working on my Deep Waters quilt made with the NEW and beautiful Banyan Batiks Color Blocking collection. In the last two posts, I shared how to make the two 15” big blocks with you.

Now to the fun part: assembling your quilt top. I know many dread this moment as we typically sew the blocks in rows and then we sew the rows together.

Right?

Well not for this quilt! Here’s my best tip when making a big block quilt. You don’t need to sew in rows and get all frustrated with long rows to sew together. I’ve been testing this method for a while and really love the ease. You basically take your blocks and sew them in groups to make bigger blocks instead of rows.

Let’s start by sewing two blocks together

Time to sew up the two quilt blocks together
Time to sew up the two quilt blocks together

When piecing the two blocks together, ensure that you do not align the blocks where two inside seams would have to align…. This will make you feel frustrated if they don’t… and they don’t have to since you can rotate one of the blocks so that they never touch. So you can focus only on having the inside center strip align.

Keep in mind to trim off the edge on the block that will have the seams connecting to the other block. Since we’ve been making this quilt with an excess ⅛” on some strips as seen in my previous posts. Once the two blocks are sewn together, you can trim off the rest of the edges.

NO! Don't match up the inside seams of your border fabric in the blocks.
NO! Don’t match up the inside seams of your border fabric in the blocks.

YES! Rotate one block so that inside seams of one block don't need to match the other block, just the center strip needs to match.
YES! Rotate one block so that inside seams of one block don’t need to match the other block, just the center strip needs to match.

Sew all your blocks together. You should only have one block left which would be the center block. This is the one I actually took a different fabric to make the center square (see earlier blog post).

Align your center strips as shown in previous blog posts and sew together. Trim after!
Align your center strips as shown in previous blog posts and sew together. Trim after!

Now for my best-kept secret to assembling a quilt top

Layout of quilt when sewing the blocks together, avoiding to make rows.
Layout of quilt when sewing the blocks together, avoiding to make rows.

Now align them as shown in the diagram. You will have 4 sets of four patch alternating with single sets.

Sewing in three sections reduces the numbers of rows to quilt
Sewing in three sections reduces the numbers of rows to quilt

Now you can sew them up in three sections. And sew them together leaving you only two big rows to sew together.

Assembling the quilt top in sections
Assembling the quilt top in sections

Hoping you enjoyed learning my best tip for assembling a quilt top. Don’t hesitate to let me know your favorite assembling methods, or, maybe you have some quilting pet peeves? Feel free to share so I can try to address them in a future blog post.

Come back tomorrow to see the final steps to finishing the mesmerizing Deep Waters quilt made with Banyan Batiks Color Blocking fabrics.

This is part 4 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 3: The best tip for squaring off your quilt blocks!

Married with three young boys, Claire Haillot shares her passion for quilting among her neighbors in the United States and Canada as well as her cousins in France. Claire has been active in the quilting industry since 2004. At first, she opened a quilt shop and started to teach, write how-to guides and translate patterns and product information into French for American companies. In 2006, she started her own line of patterns and later began publishing patterns and articles in Canadian, European and American magazines. You might have seen some of her work in Quilter’s World, Pratique du Patchwork or Canadian Quilter. She decided to close her brick & mortar quilt shop in 2016 to be able to concentrate more on teaching, writing and creating. She collaborated with PlumEasy patterns to launch the Dancing Diamonds and Gem bag patterns. Claire has also won a few awards for her work: • Juror’s choice at the Salon 2012 for her quilt Thomas goes fishing • Second Place in Vermont Quilt Festival of 2014 for her quilt Bienvenue • Second Place in Salon 2016 for her Lone Star quilt, and • Second Place in Vermont Quilt Festival 2016 for her quilt Remembering Sotchi. Her quilt Remembering Sotchi will be part of the Special Exhibit "A Celebration of Color" at the Quilt Festival in Chicago and Houston in 2018.

1 Comment

  1. Anna brown

    Tyty for sharing .I do in joy your tips…

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