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Stop stressing over your machine embroidery with the SewNotice app

 

In yesterday’s post, I shared with you 3 essential tools for your quilting studio as well as the 3 great features of the PFAFF creative icon. I explained the new CreatorCue app that is available to help you work even when you’re on the go. In today’s post, I want to talk about the SewNotice app that is also available and I’m sure that it will become your new best friend.

 

 Introducing the SewNotice app that will become your new best friend.

Introducing the SewNotice app that will become your new best friend.

 

One of the things that quilters didn’t like about machine embroidery was that it was a long process and that one had to stay by the machine to ensure that it would run smoothly.

Well, the SewNotice app changes everything! You can download the app on your smartphone and tablet and it will help you monitor your embroidery progress as it gives you information such as:

  • All color blocks in loaded design(s)
  • Current stitch number and current color block
  • Machine pop-up messages such as thread color change and bobbin thread low

It will notify you via messages on your phone when the machine has stopped; for example, when you need to change threads or when the amount of bobbin thread is low.

You read me well! You can go do other things and your phone will tell you if you need to go back to your machine to change threads or make a new bobbin.

Isn’t this just wonderful?

Makes me want to finish this quilt now so that I can play with the embroidery while quilting it.

Let’s move on to the project. Here’s the layout I chose:

 

Here's the layout I chose for my flying geese blocks.
Here’s the layout I chose for my flying geese blocks.

 

I really love the Canvas collection from Northcott fabrics and it really was the perfect choice for this project. So I aligned my flying geese blocks to ensure I sew the right ones together, two by two at first.

And I must admit that the knee lift is very handy! Check out my Tuesday post about perfecting the flying geese block for more details.

 

Knee lift helps see where to position needle.
Knee lift helps see where to position needle.

 

The trick when sewing these blocks together is to ensure that you stitch just out of the point of the flying geese, you can ensure that this is done by following along with your ¼” foot and ensuring that the point (you can see with the seams) is just on the left-hand side of the needle. You can use the knee lift to raise the foot and double check before sewing. Ensure that your needle is in the down position to ensure the pieces won’t shift in the process.

 

 Sewing your blocks together.
Sewing your blocks together.

 

Once two blocks are sewn together, sew two other blocks together to your first two, making a rectangle size 4½” x 8½”. Then sew them 2 by 2 for an 8½” square. You should have 5 squares and you can sew them together to have a 40½” x 8½” row.

 

Sew you’re A piece on the right
Sew you’re A piece on the right

 

Once that’s done you can sew your A piece on the right and B piece on the left. You might want to refer to my Monday post for the cutting instructions.

 

Sew your B piece on the left of your flying geese row.
Sew your B piece on the left of your flying geese row.

 

Again, you’ll want to use your knee lift to raise the foot and position your seam allowance.

 

Positioning your seam allowances.
Positioning your seam allowances.

 

Now that the quilt top is done, I’ll quilt the piece using some of the fantastic features of the PFAFF creative icon and we can finally use the new SewNotice app and stop stressing over our embroidery.

 

This is part 4 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 3: 3 essential tools for your quilting studio you might not have thought of

Go to part 5: PFAFF creative icon’s Shape Creator and mySewnet help your quilting adventures

 

Married with three young boys, Claire Haillot shares her passion for quilting among her neighbors in the United States and Canada as well as her cousins in France. Claire has been active in the quilting industry since 2004. At first, she opened a quilt shop and started to teach, write how-to guides and translate patterns and product information into French for American companies. In 2006, she started her own line of patterns and later began publishing patterns and articles in Canadian, European and American magazines. You might have seen some of her work in Quilter’s World, Pratique du Patchwork or Canadian Quilter. She decided to close her brick & mortar quilt shop in 2016 to be able to concentrate more on teaching, writing and creating. She collaborated with PlumEasy patterns to launch the Dancing Diamonds and Gem bag patterns. Claire has also won a few awards for her work: • Juror’s choice at the Salon 2012 for her quilt Thomas goes fishing • Second Place in Vermont Quilt Festival of 2014 for her quilt Bienvenue • Second Place in Salon 2016 for her Lone Star quilt, and • Second Place in Vermont Quilt Festival 2016 for her quilt Remembering Sotchi. Her quilt Remembering Sotchi will be part of the Special Exhibit "A Celebration of Color" at the Quilt Festival in Chicago and Houston in 2018.

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