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Making placemats using a modern disappearing 9 patch block

Yesterday I introduced you to some new Intaglio and Shadows fabrics from Banyan Batiks collections by Northcott and how to make a simple nine patch block.

Now that the nine patch block is made, it’s time to make some cuts, make that nine patch disappear and create a new, modern block!

 Let’s get started!

  • Make 2 cuts in the block to create 3 strips. For more interest, make each strip a different width.

 

Cut the nine patch block into 3 unequal strips.

 

  • Rearrange the strips to create a new block.

 

Rearrange the strips to create a new block.

 

  • Shift each strip a little so all the seams are not lined up.
  • Sew the strips together to create a new modern disappearing nine patch block.

 

Sew the strips together.

 

I’m making placemats with my new disappearing nine patch blocks, so I used a piece of template plastic (12″ x 18″) as a guide for determining where I would cut the fabric for the placemat shape. By shifting the plastic around, I can find just the right design for my placemat.

  • Trace around the plastic with a fabric pencil or chalk marker and then cut out the placemat.
  • There will be some fabric leftover you can use for another placemat.
  • If you make 3 or 4 nine patch blocks to begin with, you’ll have even more options for rearranging the strips and creating some unique, modern placemats.

 

Use a 12″ x 18″ piece of template plastic to determine the finished layout of the placemat.

 

  • Layer the placemat top, lightweight batting and backing.
  • Quilt as desired.

I used some simple straight line quilting for this modern design.

 

Simple, straight line quilting works well with the Banyan Batiks Intaglio fabrics.

 

  • For the binding, cut 3″ strips from leftover fabric and piece them together to create a multi-fabric binding. Press seams open.
  • Fold binding strip in half, wrong sides together and press.
  • Sew on the binding using a scant ½” seam.
  • Fold the binding to the back and hand-stitch in place. This will give you a ½” finished size binding.

For a more detailed description for sewing on the binding, check out my previous QUILTsocial post, Change up the way you make your quilt binding.

And here’s my finished placemat!

 

Disappearing nine patch block is now a modern design placemat!

 

My friend Marina (a beginner quilter) made this set of 8 placemats using this same technique. She used fabric from the new Canvas Spot On collection by Northcott. I think you’ll agree she did a great job!

 

Disappearing nine patch placemats made with Canvas Spot On fabrics by Northcott

 

Be sure to come back tomorrow and see how to use Banyan Batiks Intaglio fabrics to make a tote bag from a modern disappearing nine patch block.

 

This is part 2 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 1: Making a 9 patch block with the new Banyan Batiks Intaglio

Go to part 3: Making a quilted tote bag using a modern disappearing 9 patch

Jean has been designing and publishing patterns since 1997. For the past several years she has been designing patterns for new fabric collections by Northcott Fabrics. Her work has been published in several magazines in both Canada and the United States. Jean holds a Fiber Arts Certificate in quilting and has taught extensively throughout Canada, including six national Quilt Canada conferences. She was named "Canadian Teacher of the Year" in 2003 by the Canadian Quilters Association and has won numerous awards for her quilts.

8 Comments

  1. Lori

    I really like these placemats.
    Thank you for the easy to follow instructions

  2. Meredith Brooks

    This is adorable! Love this idea!

  3. Sarah Hilley

    I love this and I plan on trying this pattern very soon!

    • Send us some pictures of your finished projects. We’d love to see them!

  4. Doreen Sherk

    This is a great project for placemats, lots of possibilities. Thank you for sharing.

    • You’re welcome Doreen!

  5. Susan

    Beautiful blocks. I’m making squares, and sewing two together, right sides in, then cutting them on the diagonal to create new blocks. It’s working well.

    • Sounds like a great idea!

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